Find out more about vaccinations across our local area.

Vaccination

We are delighted that three vaccines – Pfizer/BioNTech, Oxford AstraZeneca and Moderna – have been approved by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) for use in the UK.

The approval of vaccines is a significant milestone in our response to COVID-19. It follows months of rigorous clinical trials and a thorough analysis of data by experts at the MHRA who have concluded that the vaccines meet strict standards of safety, quality and effectiveness.

Local progress

Locally we are making good progress and everyone in the first four priority groups outlined by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) has now been offered a first dose of the Covid-19 vaccine.

If you are in priority groups 1 to 4 and haven’t yet received your vaccine you can contact the NHS directly to book an appointment. You can do this by:

  • Using the NHS online booking system
  • Calling 119 free of charge between 7am – 11pm, 7 days a week
  • Contacting your GP practice to discuss options or visit your practice website.

During the coming weeks we will be be inviting people from priority groups 5, 6 and 7 which includes those aged 60 – 69 and those aged 16 – 64 who are classified as clinically vulnerable because they have a range of clinical conditions identified by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation that increase their risk from COVID-19. We will also be inviting people recently added to the updated Shielded Patient List to receive their vaccination. If you are in any of these groups you will be contacted by the NHS to book your vaccination appointment.

Vaccine questions and answers

Watch video: our local progress up to February 2021

NHS.UK: weekly COVID-19 vaccination figures

Local vaccination sites

All Covid-19 vaccinations will be provided through booked appointments. Please do not directly visit locations unless you have been invited to attend.

Vaccination sites across Bristol, North Somerset and South Gloucestershire include:

  • Hospital hubs located at Southmead Hospital, Bristol Royal Infirmary and Weston General Hospital
  • A super vaccination centre at Ashton Gate Stadium
  • Seven local pharmacies
  • 19 vaccination sites run by GPs.

GP vaccination sites

GP Practices have been working together in groups called ‘Primary Care Networks’ to provide the vaccine. Read more about Primary Care Networks and their locations.

Vaccination sites run by GPs are located at:

  • Kingswood Health Centre, Kingswood, South Gloucestershire
  • Riverbank Medical Centre, Weston-super-Mare, North Somerset
  • The Greenway, Greenway Community Centre, Southmead, Bristol
  • Pudding Pie Lane Surgery, Langford, North Somerset
  • Healthwest, Clifton College Preparatory School Hall, Bristol
  • Bridge View Medical Marksbury Road Branch, Bedminster, Bristol
  • Horfield Health Centre, Horfield, Bristol
  • Brockway Medical Centre, Nailsea, North Somerset
  • West Walk Surgery, Yate, South Gloucestershire
  • East Trees Health Centre, Fishponds, Bristol
  • Christchurch Family Medical Centre, Downend, South Gloucestershire
  • Shirehampton Group Practice, Shirehampton, Bristol
  • Portishead Medical Centre, North Somerset
  • Severnview Family Practice, Thornbury, South Gloucestershire
  • Stockwood Medical Centre, Bristol
  • Concord Medical Centre, Little Stoke, South Gloucestershire
  • Fishponds Family Practice, Fishponds, Bristol
  • Knowle West Healthy Living Centre, Bristol
  • Lodgeside Surgery, Kingswood, Bristol

Ashton Gate Stadium NHS Vaccination Centre

Ashton Gate Stadium in Bristol is our local super vaccination centre which is vaccinating people from 8am – 8pm, 7 days a week.

Pharmacies

Some pharmacies in the Bristol, North Somerset and South Gloucestershire area are now inviting people in priority groups to receive their COVID-19 vaccination.

  • Superdrug in Broadmead, Bristol
  • Locking Pharmacy, Weston-super-Mare
  • Bedminster Pharmacy (delivering vaccinations at Bedminster Methodist Church).
  • Billings Pharmacy, Kingswood
  • Ellacombe Pharmacy, Longwell Green (delivering vaccinations at Longwell Green Community Centre).
  • Kellaway Pharmacy, Bristol
  • Boots Pharmacy, The Mall Cribbs Causeway

Mobile Vaccination Programme

As part of our Vaccination Programme, mobile outreach clinics are being carried out in the community in a variety of locations. For more information or questions about a specific community clinic, please email bnssg.communications@nhs.net.

Booking now available for some people

The NHS will contact you when it’s your turn to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. However, booking is now available to people in some of the priority groups.

Priority groups 1 to 4

If you are in one of priority groups 1 to 4 you can now book your first covid-19 vaccination at a community pharmacy or vaccination centre without receiving an invitation.  This only applies to the following groups:

  • Residents in a care home for older adults and their carers
  • All those 80 years of age and over frontline health and social care workers
  • All those 75 years of age and over
  • All those 70 years of age and over and clinically extremely vulnerable individuals.

If this applies to you and you would like an appointment at a doctors’ surgery close to where you live, please call your local GP practice to discuss your options. If you would like to book an appointment at Ashton Gate stadium or one of our pharmacy locations, please use the NHS online booking system or call 119 free of charge between 7am and 11pm.

Priority group 5

If you are aged 65-69 we encourage you to book appointments at Ashton Gate Stadium Vaccination Centre or at one of seven local community pharmacies. This can be done by logging on to the NHS online booking system or calling 119.

If you are aged between 65 and 69 and have also been added to the Shielded Patient List, you also have the option of booking an appointment at Ashton Gate or a community pharmacy, or you can wait to be contacted by your GP practice.

Priority group 6

If you believe you are in priority group 6, please do not contact the NHS – you should wait to be contacted by your GP practice to book your vaccination appointment.

Priority group 6 includes those who are aged 16 – 64 and classified as clinically vulnerable because you have a range of health conditions identified by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation that increase your risk from COVID-19. We are contacting people in group 6 over the next few weeks in order of those at most risk of a more severe outcome from contracting COVID-19.

Priority group 7

If you are aged 60 – 64 you will be invited by the NHS to book your vaccination appointment at Ashton Gate Stadium Vaccination Centre or at one of seven local community pharmacies. Please wait to be contacted – the NHS will let you know when it’s your turn to have the vaccine. It’s important not to try and book your vaccination before then.

We appreciate that it can be confusing for individuals to know if they belong to one group or another. At this stage we are following a series of nationally defined criteria and that allows us to contact the people we want to come forward for vaccination.

We are working tirelessly to vaccinate our patients as quickly as possible using every potential slot and every dose of vaccine as soon as we receive it. An increase in supply is expected from 1 March 2021 across the UK and we expect to be able to increase our number of clinics, then.

Please be patient and kind to our staff; we will be in touch when it is your turn. 

In the meantime, please stay alert to the threat of the virus and follow Government guidance.

Transport to vaccination sites

Commonly asked questions

Here are some commonly asked questions and answers.  This question list was updated on 17 February 2021.

Getting vaccinated

How is the COVID-19 vaccine given?

The COVID-19 vaccine is given as an injection into your upper arm. It’s given as 2 doses, at least 3 weeks apart.

What is the priority order for getting the vaccine?

The priority list following advice from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation on 30 December 2020 is as follows:

  1. residents in a care home for older adults and their carers
  2. all those 80 years of age and over and frontline health and social care workers
  3. all those 75 years of age and over
  4. all those 70 years of age and over and clinically extremely vulnerable individuals
  5. all those 65 years of age and over
  6. all individuals aged 16 years to 64 years with underlying health conditions which put them at higher risk of serious disease and mortality. This also includes those who are in receipt of a carer’s allowance, or those who are the main carer of an elderly or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if the carer falls ill.
  7. all those 60 years of age and over
  8. all those 55 years of age and over
  9. all those 50 years of age and over

It is estimated that taken together, these groups represent around 99% of preventable mortality from COVID-19.

More information about priority groups

Watch COVID-19 vaccine video explainer: how are the priority groups decided?

Can I ring the NHS to get a vaccine?

You should wait to be contacted, unless you are in priority groups 1-5.  The NHS will let you know when it’s your turn to have the vaccine.  It’s important for you not to contact the NHS for a vaccination before then.

If you are in priority groups 1-5 please see our booking information section for details about how to contact the NHS to arrange your vaccination appointment.

How will I be contacted?

Your GP practice will contact you by letter, phone call or text message to invite you to be vaccinated at your local GP vaccination site.

You may also receive a letter from the national NHS vaccination programme inviting you to receive your vaccine at Ashton Gate Stadium or your nearest pharmacy vaccination site.

If you have been invited to receive your vaccine at Ashton Gate Stadium or a pharmacy but you’d prefer to be vaccinated closer to home, you can wait to be contacted by your GP practice to book in at your local vaccination site instead, our contact them to book yourself in if you are in priority groups 1-4.

How can I avoid getting scammed? What about fraudulent text messages, emails and phone calls?

There are several ways you might be contacted by the NHS and things to look out for in a scam or fake text message.

Read about the different ways you will be contacted and how to spot a scam

Who can get vaccinated at the Ashton Gate Stadium ‘super-vaccination centre’?

During the coming weeks we will be inviting people from priority groups 5 and 6, as outlined by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation, to receive their vaccine at the vaccination centre at Ashton Gate Stadium in Bristol.

You will receive a letter from the NHS with a unique barcode. You can then book a slot at Ashton Gate Stadium, or alternatively wait for your local GP surgery to make contact, if Ashton Gate Stadium is not convenient. We want to vaccinate the greatest number of people quickly and give people the best range of options.

If you are in one of priority groups 1-5 you can now book your first covid-19 vaccination at Ashton Gate Vaccination Centre without receiving an invitation. If this applies to you and you would like to book an appointment, please use the NHS online booking system or call 119 free of charge between 7am and 11pm.

Can I get a vaccination sooner, if I have a clinical procedure / treatment booked?

There is no flexibility for the order in which vaccinations are taking place, following advice from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) on priority groups. JCVI advises that the first priorities for the COVID-19 vaccination programme should be the prevention of mortality and the maintenance of the health and social care systems. As the risk of mortality from COVID-19 increases with age, prioritisation is primarily based on age. Priority order is detailed elsewhere in this question list.

Read more about priority groups

Why are care home workers amongst the first groups to receive the vaccine?

The JCVI have put patient-facing health and social care staff into a priority group because of their heightened risk of exposure to the virus, and the risk of passing it on to vulnerable groups.

Watch COVID-19 vaccine explainer video: Why are frontline healthcare workers among the first groups to be vaccinated?

Watch COVID-19 vaccine explainer video: Why should social care staff and care home workers have the vaccine?

Why are you postponing second doses?

The UK Chief Medical Officers have agreed a longer timeframe between first and second doses so that more people can get their first dose quickly. Evidence shows that one dose still offers a high level of protection after two weeks – 89% for the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine and 74% for the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine.

This decision will allow us to get the maximum benefit for the most people in the shortest possible time and will help save lives.

It’s important to get both doses, so we urge you to return for your second dose when you are invited.

Statement from the UK Chief Medical Officers on the prioritisation of first doses of COVID-19 vaccines

I am a health and care professional – how will I get my vaccine?

Patient-facing health and care workers are in the second priority group as set by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI). Everyone in the first four priority groups has now been offered a vaccine.

We are contacting all local health and care employers and registered bodies with information on how to invite staff to appointments. When it’s your turn, your employer will be in touch with you with details on how to book. You may also be contacted by your professional body if you are a registered health practitioner. These include:

  • Bristol Association of Sessional Doctors
  • Local Dentist Committee
  • Local Pharmacy Committee
  • Local Physiotherapy Committee

Can people book without their NHS number or if they aren’t registered with a GP?

While the NHS will write to people based on their GP records, this doesn’t mean that people that don’t have an NHS number or aren’t registered with a GP won’t be able to get vaccinated.

It does however help to be registered with a GP to help the NHS check for any reasons that someone might not be able to have a vaccine, and ensure there is a record that you have had both doses of the vaccine.

NHS.UK: How to register with a GP

What is being done to encourage vaccine uptake in Black, Asian, minority ethnic and other disproportionately affected communities/groups?

We understand that some communities have specific concerns and may be more hesitant in taking the vaccine than others. The NHS is working collaboratively with partners to ensure vaccine messages reach as diverse an audience as possible and are tailored to meet your needs.

This includes engagement with community and faith-led groups, charities and other voluntary organisations.

Sirona care & health recorded a video podcast which addresses questions and concerns being raised by some in Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic communities about the COVID-19 vaccine. Watch the video podcast on the COVID-19 vaccine.

Why aren’t BAME groups being prioritised?

There is clear evidence that certain Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) groups have higher rates of infection, and higher rates of serious disease and mortality. The reasons are multiple and complex.

What is clear is that certain health conditions are associated with increased risk of serious disease, and these health conditions are often overrepresented in certain Black, Asian and minority ethnic groups.

Prioritisation of people with underlying health conditions will also provide for greater vaccination of BAME communities who are disproportionately affected by such health conditions.

Tailored local implementation to promote good vaccine coverage in Black, Asian and minority ethnic groups will be the most important factor within a vaccine programme in reducing health inequalities in these groups.

The NHS will provide advice and information at every possible opportunity, including working closely with BAME communities, to support those receiving a vaccine and to anyone who has questions about the vaccination process.

Watch COVID-19 vaccine video explainer: How important is it for people from minority backgrounds to get the vaccine?

Can I have the vaccine during Ramadan/does the vaccine invalidate fasting?

The British Islamic Medical Association have issued specific advice urging Muslims observing Ramadan not to delay getting the vaccine, drawing on analysis from Islamic scholars which says that injections for non-nutritional purposes do not invalidate the fast.

What happens with leftover doses at the end of the day?

Vaccination services are under strict instructions to keep the number of wasted doses to an absolute minimum. Any spare vaccines due to missed or unfilled appointments, or the ability to draw additional full doses from a vial, should be used wherever possible. This is primarily done through each service operating a reserve list of eligible people – including health and social care workers, but also members of the public in the JCVI priority groups currently being vaccinated – who can be called at short notice to receive a dose where otherwise it might be wasted.

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Eligibility

In what circumstances am I NOT eligible to receive the vaccine?

If any of these apply to you:

  • unwell with a fever
  • if you’ve ever had a serious allergic reaction to a previous vaccine, a previous dose of the same COVID-19 vaccine, and some medicines, household products or cosmetics – please seek medical advice before being given the vaccine.
  • taking part in a COVID-19 vaccine trial or any other investigation of a medicinal product (please contact your trial centre for further information)
  • received the flu vaccine in the last 7 days

Can I have the vaccine if I’m pregnant or breastfeeding?

Yes. The MHRA have updated their guidance to say that pregnant women and those who are breastfeeding can have the vaccine. Speak to a healthcare professional before you have the vaccination – they will discuss the benefits and risks of the COVID-19 vaccine with you.

Read more on COVID-19 vaccination: women of childbearing age, currently pregnant or breastfeeding

I have had my flu vaccine, do I need the COVID-19 vaccine as well?

Yes. The flu vaccine does not protect you from COVID-19. You should normally have them separated by at least a week.

Do I need to leave a space between having the flu vaccine and having the COVID-19 vaccine?

It is not essential to leave time between the flu vaccine and COVID-19 vaccine but it is recommended that there should be a gap of 7 days between the two.

Can I get a vaccine if I am a Refugee/Asylum Seeker?

Yes. The Government have decided that there should be no charges for COVID-19 testing, treatment and vaccination.

Overseas visitors to England, including anyone living in the UK without permission, will not be charged for:

  • testing for COVID-19 (even if the test shows they do not have COVID-19)
  • treatment for COVID-19, including for a related problem called multisystem inflammatory syndrome that affects some children
  • vaccination against COVID-19

No immigration checks are needed for overseas visitors if they are only tested, treated or vaccinated for COVID-19.

What is the definition of an unpaid carer in priority group 6?

Unpaid carers are defined as:

  • people who are eligible for Carer’s Allowance, or
  • people who are the sole or main carer of an elderly or disabled person who is at increased risk of Covid-19 mortality and is therefore clinically vulnerable.

To be eligible for vaccination as part of group 6, carers must deliver personal care to the individual at risk. This does not include, for example, shopping or cleaning.

If you are already registered as a carer with your GP or Local Authority, or you have been confirmed as eligible for Carer’s Allowance, you will be invited for vaccination by your GP or asked to book through the national booking service. Please do not contact the NHS. It is possible you may be invited for vaccination more than once. Please do not be concerned and only book one appointment.

If you deliver personal care to an ‘at risk’ person but are not registered as a carer or are not eligible for Carer’s Allowance, you will also have the opportunity to be vaccinated. Further information about this will be available in the next few weeks. In the meantime, it is very important that you do not contact your GP or Local Authority directly to request a vaccination.

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If you have had COVID-19

Should people who have already had COVID-19 or are suffering from ‘Long Covid’ get vaccinated?   

Yes, you should get vaccinated. There is no evidence of any safety concerns from vaccinating individuals with a past history of COVID-19 infection, or with detectable COVID-19 antibody so people who have had COVID-19 disease (whether confirmed or suspected) can still receive COVID-19 vaccine.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) decided that getting vaccinated is just as important for those who have already had COVID-19 as it is for those who haven’t.

If you are suffering significant ongoing complications from COVID-19 you should discuss when to have the vaccine with your GP.

How long should I wait to be vaccinated after testing positive for COVID-19?

If you’ve recently tested positive for COVID-19 – even if you have no symptoms – you should wait four weeks (28 days) after the date you were tested before getting the vaccine.

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Vaccine safety

How safe is the COVID-19 vaccine?

The vaccines approved for use in the UK were developed by Pfizer/BioNTech, Oxford AstraZeneca and Moderna. They all meet strict standards of safety, quality and effectiveness set out by the independent Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).

Any coronavirus vaccine that is approved must go through all the clinical trials and safety checks all other licensed medicines go through. The MHRA follows international standards of safety. Other vaccines are being developed. They will only be available on the NHS once they have been thoroughly tested to make sure they are safe and effective.

So far, thousands of people have been given a COVID-19 vaccine and reports of serious side effects, such as allergic reactions, have been very rare. No long-term complications have been reported.

Watch COVID-19 explainer video:  What is an mRNA vaccine and how does it work?

Does the COVID-19 vaccine have side effects?

Most side effects are mild and should not last longer than a week, such as:

  • a sore arm where the needle went in
  • feeling tired
  • a headache
  • feeling achy
  • feeling or being sick

You can take painkillers, such as paracetamol, if you need to. If you have a high temperature you may have coronavirus or another infection. If your symptoms get worse or you are worried, call 111.

You can report any suspected side effect using the Coronavirus Yellow Card safety scheme.

Visit the Coronavirus Yellow Card to report a vaccine side effect

What about allergic reactions?

Tell healthcare staff before you are vaccinated if you’ve ever had a serious allergic reaction (anaphylaxis). You should not have the vaccine if you’ve ever had a serious allergic reaction to:

  • a previous vaccine
  • a previous dose of the same COVID-19 vaccine
  • some medicines, household products or cosmetics

Serious allergic reactions are rare. If you do have a reaction to the vaccine, it usually happens in minutes. Staff giving the vaccine are trained to deal with allergic reactions and treat them immediately.

Watch COVID-19 vaccine explainer video: If I have allergies, is it still save to have the vaccine?

What are the COVID-19 vaccine ingredients?

The COVID-19 vaccine does not contain any animal products or egg.

Watch COVID-19 explainer video: Do the vaccine’s contain any pork products?

Watch COVID-19 explainer video: How do I know it is safe?

Can the vaccine alter your genetic material?

There is no evidence to suggest that your genetic material will undergo an alteration after receiving the vaccine.

What do local people in the Bristol area think about the vaccine?

Bristol City Council’s Race Equality COVID-19 Steering Group recently held a webinar to give residents an opportunity to find out more about how the jab works. Healthcare professionals and experts came together to share information about COVID-19 vaccines, answer residents’ questions and dispel some common myths and misconceptions. Watch a video recording of the vaccine webinar

Does the COVID-19 vaccine affect fertility?

There is no evidence that the vaccine affects fertility. Most people who contract COVID-19 will develop antibody to the spike and there is no evidence of fertility problems after COVID-19 disease.

Watch COVID-19 vaccine explainer video: Can it affect my fertility?

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Accessibility and the vaccine

COVID-19 vaccine accessibility information event

Bristol, North Somerset and South Gloucestershire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and Healthwatch held an online event on 10 February 2021 to communicate how the COVID-19 vaccine is being made more accessible for all communities including older less mobile people, disabled people, people with learning disabilities and people with mental health problems and to help people make an informed choice

The event included details about the vaccine itself and how you can book and access your vaccination.

Read a transcript for the accessibility webinar

Learning disability resources

Keepsafe.org.uk is a free resource with lots of helpful video guides on COVID-19 vaccination for people with learning disabilities.

British Sign Language resources

GOV.UK has created some British Sign Language (BSL) videos on COVID-19 vaccination.

Resources in different languages

GOV.UK has created a number of COVID-19 vaccination information guides in multiple languages.

Effectiveness of the vaccine

How effective is the COVID-19 vaccine?

The MHRA have said this vaccine is highly effective. The first dose of the vaccine should give you good protection from coronavirus, but you need to have the second dose to give you full protection which is longer lasting.

After having both doses of the vaccine most people will be protected against coronavirus. There is a small chance you might still get or spread coronavirus even if you have the vaccine. This means it is important to:

  • continue to follow social distancing guidance
  • if you can, wear something that covers your nose and mouth in places where it’s hard to stay away from other people.

Watch COVID-19 vaccine explainer video: How a vaccine works

Watch COVID-19 vaccine explainer video: What the data shows so far about the protection given by the vaccine

Watch COVID-19 vaccine explainer video: Should I still follow government guidance after I’ve had my vaccine?

How long does the vaccine take to become effective?

The first dose of the vaccine should give you good protection from coronavirus, but to get full protection you need to have the second dose – this is really important.

Full protection kicks in around a week or two after that second dose, which is why it’s also important that when you do get invited, you get yourself booked in as soon as possible.

Watch COVID-19 vaccine explainer video: How important is it to have two doses of the vaccine?

How long will the vaccine be effective for?

We expect these vaccines to work for at least a year – if not longer. This will be constantly monitored.

Will the vaccine work with the new strain?

There is no evidence currently that the new strain will be resistant to the vaccine we have, so we are continuing to vaccinate people as normal. Scientists are looking now in detail at the characteristics of the virus in relation to the vaccine. Viruses, such as the winter flu virus, often branch into different strains but these small variations rarely render vaccines ineffective.

Were the trial participants reflective of a multi-ethnic population?

The Public Assessment Reports contain all the scientific information about the trials and information on trial participants.

For the Pfizer trial, 9.8% of participants were black, 26.1% Hispanic/Latino and 3.4% Asian.

For the Oxford/AstraZeneca trial, 10.1% of participants were Black and 3.5% Asian.

For the Moderna trial, 19.7% of participants were Hispanic/Latino, and 9.7% African American.

Does the vaccine work on those taking immune suppressants?

Although the vaccine was not tested on those with very serious immunological conditions, the vaccine has been proven to be very effective and it is unlikely that the vaccine will have no effect at all on these individuals.

There may be a very small number of people with very complex or severe immunological problems who can’t make any response at all – but the vaccine should not do any harm to these individuals. If you meet this criteria you may want to discuss the vaccine further with your specialist doctor.

Watch COVID-19 vaccine explainer video: If I am immunosuppressed can I have the vaccine?

Is one better than the other?

The important point for any vaccine is whether the MHRA approves it for use – if it does then that means it’s a worthwhile vaccine to have and people should have it if they are eligible.

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The different types of vaccine

Which vaccines for Covid-19 are currently available?

The Government has in principle secured access to seven different vaccine candidates, across four different vaccine types, totalling over 357 million doses. This includes:

  • 40 million doses of the BioNTech/Pfizer vaccine
  • 100m doses of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine
  • 17 million doses of the Moderna vaccine, which has been approved by the MHRA but is not expected to be delivered to the NHS until Spring.

It will likely take until at least Spring 2021 until all high risk groups have been offered a Covid vaccine.

Do I get to choose which vaccine I would prefer?

This won’t be possible. Any vaccine that the NHS provides will have been approved by the MHRA following tests on safety and efficacy, so everyone should be assured that whatever vaccine you are offered, it is worth your while having it.

Can I get one privately? 

No. Vaccinations are only available through the NHS. You can be contacted by the NHS, your employer or a GP surgery local to you to receive your vaccine. Remember, the vaccine is free of charge.

  • The NHS will never ask you for your bank account or card details.
  • The NHS will never ask you for your PIN or banking password.
  • The NHS will never arrive unannounced at your home to administer the vaccine.
  • The NHS will never ask you to prove your identity by sending copies of personal documents such as your passport, driving license, bills or pay slips.

What about the Moderna vaccine? Why is this available in the USA but not here?

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) have now decided – after extensive assessment – that the Moderna vaccines are safe and effective. The Government ordered several million doses of this vaccine ahead of it being approved, but we don’t expect Moderna to be able to make these available until Spring 2021.

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Healthier Together is hosting information about the local COVID-19 vaccination programme to provide all of the latest information and guidance. The vaccination programme is coordinated nationally by the NHS so we are unable to answer individual enquiries by phone or at our usual email address. If you have an urgent query, firstly check your correspondence for contact details, or email bnssg.massvaccination@nhs.net. Thank you.